Ang Lee is my favourite director…

 

…he is, he just is, it’s official.  Every movie he makes is beautiful.  Different, touching, thoroughly entertaining and beautiful.  Life of Pi is one of my favourite books and not only didn’t Ang Lee ruin it like every other director does with my favourite books, he brought more to it.  It’s gorgeous and crazy and utterly engaging from beginning to end.  It’s different than any other nominated film out there this season.  It gave me the experience I want when I see a film, and very rarely get; being immersed in a story for 2 hours and enjoying it immensely.  Anyway, I don’t want to publicly bad mouth a few of the other movies I’ve seen recently…ok, I sooo do but I know it’s not nice so I won’t…but I do want to recommend this if you’re wondering what to see at the theatre.  It won’t win the awards it should win, because the big, pushy, loud, popular girls, I mean movies, will.  But it should.  (Kathy)

This entry was posted by Women Fully Clothed on Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 at 2:48 pm and is filed underLove It. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

5 Comments

  1. danya nielsen says:

    kathy,
    all fingers and toes are crossed for Ang Lee
    and the Life of Pi, at Oscars tonight !

  2. janet newfield says:

    Kathy,
    If you enjoy immersion in a book, I suggest Kate
    Morton’s “The Forgotten Garden “. Slow to start
    but soon addictive. The gift from author to
    reader is the suspension of reality and the
    expansion of imagination.It truly is a magic
    carpet ride. Enjoy!

    • Women Fully Clothed says:

      Oh thank you! I love book recommendations. (Kathy)

      • Pat Edwards says:

        Kathy,
        For more immersion in a book, try Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dilliard, written at age twenty-eight and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1975. It is a book book in search of the sacred, containing much wisdom and exquisite writing. Unbelievably written at age twenty-eight.